PowerShell script to find all IP addresses assigned on a list of Windows Servers

### PowerShell script to find all IP addresses assigned on a list of Windows Servers.
### List all IP addresses assigned in each server, includes IPv6
###############################################################################

$servers = Get-Content “D:\temp\test2.txt”
$reg=””
foreach ($server in $servers)
{
$reg+=$server+ “`t”+([System.Net.Dns]::GetHostAddresses(“$server”) | foreach {echo $_.IPAddressToString})+”`n”
}
$reg > “D:\temp\ping-IPs-1.csv”

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PowerShell script to find FQDN and get ping status of Windows Servers

### PowerShell script to find FQDN and get ping status for given list of windows servers
# Servers which we failed to connect to get any info are collected in to a txt file.
### Writing credits : VM ###
###########################################################################

$servers = Get-Content “D:\temp\test2.txt”

@(
foreach ($name in $servers)
{
if ( Test-Connection -ComputerName “$name.domain.com” -Count 1 -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue ) { Write-output “$name.domain.com is up”}
elseif ( Test-Connection -ComputerName “$name.a.domain.com” -Count 1 -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue ) { Write-output “$name.a.domain.com is up”}
elseif ( Test-Connection -ComputerName “$name.b.domain.com” -Count 1 -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue ) { Write-output “$name.b.domain.com is up”}
elseif ( Test-Connection -ComputerName “$name.c.domain.com” -Count 1 -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue ) { Write-output “$name.c.domain.com is up”}
elseif ( Test-Connection -ComputerName “$name.newdomain.com” -Count 1 -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue ) { Write-output “$name.newdomain.com is up”}
#elseif ( Test-Connection -ComputerName “$name” -Count 1 -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue ) { Write-output “$name is up”}
else
{
Write “$name FQDN not found/ server is not pinging” | out-file -Append “D:\temp\failed-ping-1.txt” -NoClobber
}
}
) | Out-file -FilePath “D:\temp\FQDN-1.csv”

PowerShell script to find a server is physical server or virtual machine

### Powershell script gives Manufacturer and Server Model for a given list of servers, and we can find if its a VM or a physical server.
### eg: for a VM, manufacturer will be “VMware, Inc.”, and model will be “VMware Virtual Platform”
### eg: for a physical server, manufacturer will be “HP” (or others), and model will be “ProLiant BL460c G7”
### Servers which we failed to connect to get any info are collected in to a txt file.
### writing credits : VM ###
#######################################################################################

$servers = Get-Content “D:\temp\test2.txt”
$result = @()
$finalresult = @()

foreach ($computer in $servers)
{
$result = Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_ComputerSystem -ComputerName $computer | select pscomputername, manufacturer, model
$finalresult+=$result
if (!$result) { Write “No info on server $computer” | out-file -Append “D:\temp\notfound-phy-vm.txt” -NoClobber }
$computer = $null
$result = $null
}

$finalresult | export-csv “D:\temp\VMphys-1.csv” -NoTypeInformation

PowerShell script to find OS name, Service Pack Version and OS-Architecture (32/64 bit)

### PowerShell script to find OS name, Service Pack Version and OS-Architecture (32/64 bit) for given list of servers
# servers which we failed to connect to get any info are collected in to a txt file
### writing credits : VM ###
#######################################################################################

$servers = Get-Content “D:\temp\test2.txt”
$result = @()
$finalresult = @()

foreach ($srv in $servers)
{
$result = Get-WMIObject Win32_OperatingSystem -ComputerName $srv | Select-Object csname, caption, ServicePackMajorVersion, OSArchitecture
$finalresult+=$result
if (!$result) { Write “No info on server $srv” | out-file -Append “D:\temp\notfound.txt” -NoClobber }
$srv = $null
$result = $null
}

$finalresult | export-csv “D:\temp\OS-outputs.csv” -NoTypeInformation

How To Clean Up C:\Windows\Winsxs

So you’ve been taking a look at what’s eating your hard drive space with WinDirStat or TreeSizeFree or similar and have spotted the C:\Windows\Winsxs folder.

Winsxs stands for Windows Side by Side and is basically where Windows keeps multiple versions of the same .dll’s to allow multiple applications to run without any compatibility problems. If you browse it you’ll see what looks like a lot of duplicate .dll files. I’m not going to go into the in’s and out’s of it here as there are plenty of good run through pages on the web.

What I will do is give you the easy and safe way to clear it down.

From the C:\Windows\System32 folder run:

DISM /online /Cleanup-Image /SpSuperseded

 

This blog was copied from: http://sysbadmin.wordpress.com/2012/10/14/how-to-clean-up-cwindowswinsxs/

 

What is IOPS and how to calculate IOPS for an application (Exchange, SQL, Sharepoint,etc.)

What is it and how to calculate IOPS

This question is frequent, mostly because how Dell solutions Consultant that is a hardware manufacturer we know.

What are IOPS?

Is the number of operations per second that an individual disk can arrive. For example, a 10 k SAS disk achieves on average 140 IOPS.

This speed is standard in the industry with variations between models, but we can have a base of what is acceptable and the disk manufacturer can tell you this number.

However, note that the difference is very large, especially taking into account the new SSD drives. For example, the disk Intel x 25-E (See the pdf with the characteristics http://download.intel.com/design/flash/nand/extreme/extreme-sata-ssd-datasheet.pdf) arrives at numbers 30 times larger than the SAS and SATA disks.

 

model

Because the IOPS is so important?

This question is obvious, but the explanation may not be so simple. It turns out that in most cases we have the tendency to minimize the issue saying it is “performance” or “user perception” but in fact can impact directly on the running of an application, in some cases may even paralyze the application.

For example, an Exchange 2003 environment with 2 thousand mailboxes need 1.5 thousand IOPS and this number is not easy to achieve. The SQL Server database to a SharePoint needs 5 thousand IOPS to work.

How to calculate the IOPS?

Multiply the total number of disks for the RAID type and will get your number. Here some examples:

table

RAID 1, RAID 10 or RAID 0 will give you proportional the largest number of IOPS possible because RAID 5,  the calculation takes into account disk 1 and unless 2 disks RAID 50 unless parities.

How to achieve the highest IOPS possible with greater capacity?

We have three ways to do this:

  1. Use high-performance disks as the 15 k SAS or SSD, but are expensive and in the case of SSD only sizes 32/50/64/100 GB
  2. Use the proper RAID type for the performance and not to the size you want as many today make, which often involves using RAID 10 for total performance rather than RAID 50, we would lose into ability but we gain in performance
  3. Buy a storage that works with virtual LUNs, i.e. it allocates the data on the disks as the need for this given and does not need to say the RAID type

What are virtual LUNs?

Let’s not go into technical point since this is much more complex, but we can understand what is this new technology without becoming experts in storage.

Using the Dell arrays as an example, the MD3200i works with LUNs in the normal way we know. You indicate that the disks X the Y form a RAID 0, Z to W RAID 5 and so on. I.e. we map directly to the disks and are dependent on the ability of each individual IO.

Already in the series EqualLogic we can define the size of the LUN without indicate the disks and storage will automatically allocate more data accessed on disks faster (!!!!). You must be thinking it is joke or something like “concept”, but it is not!!

The new arrays sold by Dell, EMC, IBM and others are smart and allow you to mix the disks. For example, can I put in SSD disks storage drawer and one more additional drawer with 24 SAS 15 k disks and not worry if the LUN created is the disks more performance, who will do this job is storage.

And, the more interesting, when the storage “perceive” that certain data (LUN) is more accessible than another it will relocate to faster disks and make the shift of data without performance loss and intervention, since works in background and automatic!!!!

Interesting references

How to calculate IOPS for Exchange 2003 http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb125019 (EXCHG. 65) .aspx

How to calculate IOPS for Exchange 2010 http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ee832791.aspx

How to calculate IOPS for the SharePoint 2010 and SQL http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc298801.aspx

Utility to measure IOPS for SQL Server (SQLIO) http://www.microsoft.com/download/en/details.aspx?displaylang=br&id=20163

References of EqualLogic S6000 http://www.equallogic.com/products/default.aspx?id=9511

This Blog was copied from:
http://msincic.wordpress.com/2011/07/03/what-is-it-and-how-to-calculate-iops-exchange-sql-sharepoint-others/

Five quick windows command prompt tricks

 

1.    Send any Command’s Output to the Clipboard

Note: This will work for any command.

How many times have you used the ipconfig command only to copy and paste the output?  You will never have to do that again as you can simply send the output directly to the clipboard.

Eg:

         ipconfig | clip

 

 2.    Open Command Prompt From a Folder

Do you like to open the command prompt and enter endless cd commands trying to get to the correct folder? If the answer is a NO, then you will pleased to know that you can actually save a lot of time by opening a command prompt within a folder from Windows Explorer.

All you have to do is hold SHIFT while right-clicking on a folder and the option “Open command window here” will appear in the context menu.

 

 

 3.    Command History

You most likely have been pressing the up key to get to your previous commands, but this can be a pain when you are trying to track down a particular command. One other way you can view your past command is to use the doskey command.

         doskey /history

doskey

 

 4.    Drag and Drop Files to Change the Current Path

Another neat trick if you are not a fan of opening a command prompt from the context menu is the ability to drag and drop folders onto the prompt and have it automatically enter the path of the folder. You’ll need to type the CD command and then drag the folder over to actually change the path, but you can use the same technique for a lot of different commands.

 5.    Run Multiple Commands In One Go

Our final trick of the day is one that many command line geeks may already know, the ability to run multiple command at once by linking them with double ampersands. You can do this with any commands and you can link up as many as you want. Eg:

         ipconfig /all  && netstat -aon

 


BONUS: If you want to avoid the IPv6 crap when you run ipconfig, and like to view just the IPv4 addresses, use this:

          ipconfig | find “IPv4”

http://www.howtogeek.com/119386/5-windows-command-prompt-tricks-you-probably-dont-know