PowerShell script to find a server is physical server or virtual machine

### Powershell script gives Manufacturer and Server Model for a given list of servers, and we can find if its a VM or a physical server.
### eg: for a VM, manufacturer will be “VMware, Inc.”, and model will be “VMware Virtual Platform”
### eg: for a physical server, manufacturer will be “HP” (or others), and model will be “ProLiant BL460c G7”
### Servers which we failed to connect to get any info are collected in to a txt file.
### writing credits : VM ###
#######################################################################################

$servers = Get-Content “D:\temp\test2.txt”
$result = @()
$finalresult = @()

foreach ($computer in $servers)
{
$result = Get-WmiObject -Class Win32_ComputerSystem -ComputerName $computer | select pscomputername, manufacturer, model
$finalresult+=$result
if (!$result) { Write “No info on server $computer” | out-file -Append “D:\temp\notfound-phy-vm.txt” -NoClobber }
$computer = $null
$result = $null
}

$finalresult | export-csv “D:\temp\VMphys-1.csv” -NoTypeInformation

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Troubleshooting a failed virtual machine conversion task

Conversions sometimes fail no matter how careful you are preparing the server. The failure can occur at various stages in the conversion process; these stages are based on the task bar percent and are estimated values.

1. Creation of the target virtual machine (VM) (0%-5%)
2. Preparing to Clone the Disk (5%-6%)
3. Cloning (6%-95%)
4. Post-cloning (95%-97%)
5. Customization/Reconfiguration (97%-99%)
6. Install Tools/Power On (99%-100%)

Converter creates a detailed log file during the conversion process which will contain exact errors pertaining to why the conversion failed. This log file is located on the server you are converting that is running the Converter agent, and is usually named vmware-converter-0.log and is located in the C:\Windows\temp\vmware-temp directory.