The Six Enemies of Greatness (and Happiness) – Forbes.com

The Six Enemies of Greatness (and Happiness) – Forbes

The Six Enemies of Greatness (and Happiness)
These six factors can erode the grandest of plans and the noblest of intentions. They can turn visionaries into paper-pushers and wide-eyed dreamers into shivering, weeping balls of regret. Beware!

 

 1) Availability

We often settle for what’s available, and what’s available isn’t always great. “Because it was there,” is an okay reason to climb a mountain, but not a very good reason to take a job or a free sample at the supermarket.

 And sadly, we'll never know everything.

 2) Ignorance

If we don’t know how to make something great, we simply won’t. If we don’t know that greatness is possible, we won’t bother attempting it. All too often, we literally do not know any better than good enough.

 

 3) Committees

Nothing destroys a good idea faster than a mandatory consensus. The lowest common denominator is never a high standard.

 

 4) Comfort

Why pursue greatness when you’ve already got 324 channels and a recliner? Pass the dip and forget about your grand designs.

 

5) Momentum

If you’ve been doing what you’re doing for years and it’s not-so-great, you are in a rut. Many people refer to these ruts as careers.

 

6) Passivity

 There’s a difference between being agreeable and agreeing to everything. Trust the little internal voice that tells you, “this is a bad idea.”

See Also: 

How To Be More Interesting (In 10 Simple Steps) 

Nine Dangerous Things You Were Taught In School

Why Innovation Dies

Comments

  • Michela StriblingMichela Stribling 1 month ago

    Your points really resonated with me. A rut does not a career make could not be more true.

    I generally find that the seventh enemy of greatness and happiness is boredom and its accompanying lethargy. There’s nothing more energizing than a renewed sense of purpose; and sometimes searching for a new purpose can be just as rewarding as identifying the purpose itself.

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  • Anil SaxenaAnil Saxena 1 month ago

    This is awesome. You have hit the nail on the head. Jim Collins (I think), said that good is the enemy of the great. You have illustrated this so well.

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  • sigmadeltasigmadelta 1 month ago

    Well articulated.
    Awareness of multiplicity leads to a potential for self-direction.

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  • Kuldeep Singh 1 month ago

    Very well articulated. A beaut sum up off years of experience in just 6 Simple heading.

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  • Nishanth Udhaya 1 month ago

    nice article…. those are real enemies if our happiness in life… thanks for article….

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  • Elena Thompson 1 month ago

    That’s A Like 😉

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  • Amit BhagatAmit Bhagat 1 month ago

    A nice way to pen down the thoughts..

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